Eco-Friendly New Baby Postcard

 

 

AlisonSye52

AlisonSye52b

Well, since I’ve already listed a card made two years ago, I may as well do another one.

Those of you who have been with me from the start, know that my first post was about the wonderful Birds by Brian Wildmith, 1969.

Well, I am finally getting around to listing more of the cards, made from said book (and some cereal boxes), in my shop.

I thought it would make a good New Baby card.

This card is unique, there is no other the same. It is a one-off.

It is not a print, it is made from the actual book, which is 44 years old.

Brian Wildsmith is a hero of mine. He was born in 1930 and grew up in a small mining village in the north of England. Being a miner’s daughter from the north myself, I need no more than this to like him. However, there is a lot more to like, not least his wonderful children’s books.

It is completely upcycled, and very eco-friendly, as everything used in its making was destined for the bin.

I absolutely never cut up healthy books, nor do I clean up any blemishes left by life. Kind friends save food packaging for me, and the books I use have been ‘retired’ from local schools and libraries, after years of loyal service.

All of my work is numbered, this is 52.

Enjoy the rest of the weekend,

Alison

Oh, and I will be having a Valentine giveaway on 14th Jan (yes, Jan).

Eco-Friendly Valentine Postcard

 

AlisonSye53

Happy New Year!

Those of you who have been with me from the start, know that my first post was about the wonderful Birds by Brian Wildmith, 1969.

Well, I am finally getting around to listing one of the cards, made from said book (and some cereal boxes), in my shop.

I thought it would make a good Valentine card.

This card is unique, there is no other the same. It is a one-off.

It is not a print, it is made from the actual book, which is 44 years old.

Brian Wildsmith is a hero of mine. He was born in 1930 and grew up in a small mining village in the north of England. Being a miner’s daughter from the north myself, I need no more than this to like him. However, there is a lot more to like, not least his wonderful children’s books.

It is completely upcycled, and very eco-friendly, as everything used in its making was destined for the bin.

I absolutely never cut up healthy books, nor do I clean up any blemishes left by life. Kind friends save food packaging for me, and the books I use have been ‘retired’ from local schools and libraries, after years of loyal service.

It measures 15cms x 19.3cms.

All of my work is numbered, this is 53.

If you have any questions, please give me a shout,

Alison x

PS. I will be having a Valentine giveaway on 14th Jan.

AlisonSye53b

 

14. ‘Birds’ by Brian Wildsmith (1969), Revisited

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Happy Tuesday morning, pretty cold out there.

I started writing a blog in January of this year, in order to keep a record of the history of the materials I use.

My first ever post was about ‘Birds’ by Brian Wildsmith. I spent the next couple of months making cards from this 44 years old book, and enjoyed every minute of it. In the end (or maybe not), there are now 14 posts on my blog regarding this subject. They are categorized as ‘1-78’, if you would like to read them.

The first nine cards are Christmas birds (you can see them here), not very appropriate at the beginning of the year. I filed them away, thinking I would put them on Folksy this Christmas. I remembered about them as I was walking to work on Sunday, so I have put what is left in my shop. There are more cards from this book to come, but these are the only Christmas ones.

Just a reminder, there is a complimentary card with every order before 15th December 2013.

Have a great week,

Alison x

13. ‘Birds’ by Brian Wildsmith (1969), Ten Tiny Paperchase Cards

Numbers: 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78 and 42

Used every last scrap of the book making these tiny patchwork cards, not to sell but to give as gifts. They are mounted onto blank Paperchase cards given to me by a friend. The paper looks handmade, it’s  not cut well and the cards do not align, but I can’t bring myself to undermine somebody else’s work by trimming them down – especially as that person probably works for a pittance somewhere else in the world.

Very satisfying to have used the whole book, but also a little sad to have nothing left.

There are twelve other posts relating to this book.

alisonsyep26

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12. ‘Birds’ by Brian Wildsmith (1969), Seven Small Cards

Numbers: 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68 and 69

Rather than waste the very small illustrations, I often make very small cards. I sometimes include them as gifts in an order. I haven’t put these in my shop as they only measure 5.5cms x 5.5cms, when folded.

Little bit of trivia – There is a ‘Brian Wildsmith Museum’ in Japan. The Japanese know a good thing when they see it.

Tiny Cards

Tiny Cards

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11. ‘Birds’ by Brian Wildsmith (1969), The Cover

Numbers: 59, 60, 61 and 62

In my frenzy to use every part of the book, I made these postcard from the cover. The card was very thick and it took a number of scores before my scalpel finally went all the way through. I didn’t manage to get it straight, and so will keep these cards for personal use. However, although it was damaged, I wish I hadn’t cut the cover at all. What was I thinking?

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10. ‘Birds’ by Brian Wildsmith (1969), Nine More Postcards

Numbers: 49, 50, 51, 52, 54, 55, 56, 57 and 58

This week I made postcards and listened to The Smiths. It’s the quality of the paper which has given these such a pleasing result, that thick mattness. They are lovely to hold in your hands. Sometimes I get very excited to find an old book, only to discover that the print and paper are of poor quality, thin and shiny. Someone offered me a David McKee book recently and I declined for this reason, and nobody loves David McKee more than me! Anyway, I digress.

50 and 52, the ‘bitterns’ illustrations could not be made into my regular cards as the image was too big, and I didn’t want to separate the parent from the child. As it happens, they will make wonderful ‘new baby’ gifts. I didn’t mention earlier that Brian Wildsmith dedicated this book to his son, Simon.

49, 51, 57 and 58 are made from the dust jacket, which had been torn and scribbled upon. On 57 and 58 I added some left-over scraps from the pages.

54 and 55 were made from bits of text, with a few little page scraps added to fill in the gaps on 55. The bright yellow background on 54 was the opening blank page of the book. A sure sign of quality, as it serves no purpose other than beauty. Even before looking at the images you are treated to a large blast of sunshine.

56 is the first page.

All cards are mounted onto used cereal boxes and are not uniform in size. I have added a few to my Folksy shop.

I have made some more cards using scraps, being determined not to waste any part. However, I need to wait for the glue to dry before sewing. More on those later.

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Back of postcard
Back of postcard