Eric Huntley

Eric Huntley at the Walter Rodney bookshop, photo by Syd Jeffers.

Eric and his wife Jessica (the caption doesn’t say so, but I’m thinking that might be her, standing behind him) were radical book publishers and political activists.

They established Bogle-L’Ouverture Publications (named after Caribbean resistance heroes) in 1968, to promote radical Black writing.

In 1974, they opened a bookshop in West Ealing, London, later to become the Walter Rodney Bookshop. It quickly established itself as a drop-in advice centre, with book launches, school workshops and poetry readings.

The square is cut from a leaflet for a free Guildhall exhibition (2015) entitled ‘No Colour Bar’. The highlight of which, for me, was a recreation of the bookshop.

Sadly, I was unable to gather any information about Syd Jeffers, the photographer.

This is the fifth patch of my ‘London Exhibition Patchwork’. It is a patchwork made from leaflets of exhibitions I have visited in London. There are sixteen squares in total.

You can see the whole piece here and in my shop, or you can follow my progress on Instagram, if you are so inclined.

Discobolus

Marble statue of a discus-thrower (Discobolus). One of several Roman copies of the Greek original bronze version by Myron, 5th century BC.

In 1938, Hitler, funded by the German government, bought one of said Roman copies. The Italian family who owned it had fallen upon hard times, and so offered him up for sale. He was earmarked for the Metropolitan Museum in New York, but it couldn’t afford him.

Discobolus became a Nazi poster boy, whether he liked it or not.

In 1948 he was returned to Italy, and can now be seen in the National Museum, Rome.

The square was cut from a British Museum leaflet (2015).

This is the first patch of my ‘London Exhibition Patchwork’. It is a patchwork made from leaflets of exhibitions I have visited in London. There are sixteen squares in total.

You can see the whole piece here and in my shop, or you can follow my progress on Instagram, if you are so inclined.

London Exhibition Patchwork

Another patchwork to add to my collection (London Faces, Dads, London Couples, Mothers, Men’s Stuff and Barcelona), as usual, handsewn from things found in the bins (and pavements) of London.

On this piece, the squares are cut from leaflets for exhibitions I have visited. It is not a print. It is a one-off. I actually made it last year, but never got around to documenting its provenance.

I’m going to do that now. The following posts will be the gathering of this information. Sometimes, this can take as long as making the actual artwork (the previous patchwork took a year to record), but I feel compelled to do it. Whenever possible, I always credit the photographers and designers whose work I use.

You can also follow my progress on Instagram.

Once I have posted about each individual square, I will add a link below.

It’s in my Folksy shop.

16. London Pairs Patchwork – Vertigo

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“They’ll always remember me in “Vertigo”, and I’m not that good in it, but I don’t blame me because there are a couple of scenes where I was wonderful”. Kim Novak.

This square shows Kim Novak and Jimmy Stewart in a scene from Vertigo. Directed by Alfred Hitchcock, who was the subject of a previous square. Cinematography by Robert Burks. One of Mr S’s favourite films (Goodfellas, being his favourite).

Having spent the last couple of hours reading about Kim Novak, I now feel sad. About Hollywood. And women. And Women in Hollywood. Seems she had the right idea in getting the hell outa Dodge.

This is the final square of my London Pairs Patchwork. It is a patchwork of papers gleaned from the pavements (mostly) of the city in which I live. There are sixteen squares making up the whole piece. You can see it here.

The square was cut from a BFI leaflet.

All of my work is numbered. This piece is 795.

The patchwork is now in my shop.

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15. London Pairs Patchwork – Fernanda Oliveira and Alejandro Virelles

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‘O’er the glad waters of the dark blue sea, Our thoughts are boundless, and our souls as free.’ Byron.

This is the fifteenth square of my London Pairs Patchwork. It is a patchwork of papers gleaned from the pavements (mostly) of the city in which I live. There are sixteen squares making up the whole piece. You can see it here.

The square is a scene from Le Corsaire, and was cut from a leaflet for the English National Ballet. The dancers are Fernanda Oliveira and Alejandro Virelles, and the photograph was taken by Perry Curties.

Conrad, the dashing pirate, braves the high seas to rescue Medora, the beautiful harem girl who has been sold as a slave.

Based on The Corsair by Byron, which sold ten thousand copies on its first day, 1814.

All of my work is numbered. This piece is 795.

The patchwork is now in my shop.

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14. London Pairs Patchwork – Mr and Mrs Clark and Blanche

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“It’s a useful thing, Photoshop, but I think it’s made a lot of magazines look very similar, rather boring.” David Hockney.

This is the fourteenth square of my London Pairs Patchwork. It is a patchwork of papers gleaned from the pavements (mostly) of the city in which I live. There are sixteen squares making up the whole piece. You can see it here.

The square shows a section of a David Hockey painting, Mr and Mrs Clark and Percy, 1971. I cut it from Tate Guide (Feb/March 2015), given to me by my friend, Cathy.

Mr Clark is the fashion designer Ossie Clark and Mrs Clark is the textile designer Celia Birtwell. They are in the bedroom of their Notting Hill flat with their cat, Percy*.

When Celia and Ossie were married in 1969, Hockney was their Best Man.

* I have just heard from my friend, John Loader, via Woman’s Hour (he thinks), that this cat is in fact not Percy but Blanche. Blanche did not sound good in the title. They did have a cat named Percy, but this is not he. Thanks, John.

All of my work is numbered. This piece is 795.

The patchwork is now in my shop.

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13. London Pairs Patchwork -The Moomins

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“I lived on this great big housing estate in suburban Liverpool, from a working class background, and somehow this bohemian, upper middle-class, Finnish lesbian eccentric felt like she was speaking directly to me.” Frank Cottrell Boyce.

Tove Jansson, writer, artist, creator of the Moomins (in picture above) was born in Helsinki in 1914. She was great. Just great.

This is the thirteenth square of my London Pairs Patchwork. It is a patchwork of papers gleaned from the pavements (mostly) of the city in which I live. There are sixteen squares making up the whole piece. You can see it here.

All of my work is numbered. This piece is 795.

The square was cut from a BFI leaflet.

The patchwork is now in my shop.

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