15. Patchwork Dads – Stewart Lee

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Stewart Lee, comic, and father of some children. Unless he just makes that up.

I have seen his act a few times. Brilliant each time. Most recently, at the Leicester Square Theatre in 2015. It was a birthday present from Mr. S.

*At the end of this particular gig, he ran to the men’s loos and locked himself in a cubicle (Stewart Lee, not Mr. S), before the audience had finished applauding. He dove off the stage and properly ran. I was sitting at the end of the back row, by the door, and he brushed by me like one of my dad’s whippets. I presume he then listened to what the toilet-users had to say about him. He was in there bloody ages. They took quite a while to clear, what with one of the cubicles being occupied.

Hats off to him. I might start hanging around in the bog. Endless material, probably.

This is the fifteenth square in my patchwork of dads. It is made from discarded books, magazines, postcards and junk mail. From the actual papers, I have not printed or copied anything. There are sixteen squares in total. You can see the whole piece here.

I cut the square from the leaflet below. The photographer is not credited, but I am on the case.

* There is a 1% chance this didn’t happen.

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14. Patchwork Dads – Peter Blake

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Peter Blake, artist, wrestling fan, and, father of Juliette, Daisy and Rose.

Photograph by Luke Andrew Walker. Taken from ‘London Exhibitions Guide’ (Feb-May 2016). Art Fund.

This is the fourteenth square in my patchwork of dads. It is made from discarded books, magazines, postcards and junk mail. From the actual papers, I have not printed or copied anything. There are sixteen squares in total.

You can see the whole piece here, or follow my progress on Instagram.

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13. Patchwork Dads – Joseph

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Joseph, father of Jesus, by Kees de Kort.

This is the thirteenth square in my patchwork of dads. It is made from discarded books, magazines, postcards and junk mail. It is made from the actual papers, I have not printed or copied anything. There are sixteen squares in total.

You can see the whole piece here, or follow my progress on Instagram.

Taken from ‘Jesus Is Born’, a retired library book. Published by The British And Foreign Bible Society, 1975. Printed by John Blackburn Ltd.,Old Run House, Hunslet, Leeds.


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16. Patchwork Of Mothers – Joan Maude

I’ve reached the final face on my Patchwork Of Mothers, and it is now in my shop. It takes almost as long to record this stuff as it does to make it.

Joan Maude by Madame Yevonde, 1932. Taken from the NPG booklet shown below (Face To Face, Autumn/Winter 2016).

Maude was an English actress, daughter of Nancy Price, and great-granddaughter of Jenny Lind.

She married Frank Waters in 1933 (St. Clement Danes, Strand, London), and they had one daughter. Sadly, Frank died at the age of 45.

Her obituary (1998) said that in her later years, she walked each day on the South Downs.

The photographer, Madame Yevonde, was not a mother (or French, I think). She was a suffragette from Bromley. At the age of 21 she set up her massively successful photography studio, at 92 Victoria Street, London. I walk up this street frequently, so could easily take a photograph. All I have to do is remember to look for the number, next time I’m in the area. Easier said than done.

You can see the whole patchwork, and my research, here.

15. Patchwork Of Mothers – Pam’s Mummy

I don’t know the name of Mother 15, on my Patchwork Of Mothers, except that she is Pam’s mum from the 1988 Little Star annual. Nor, sadly, can I find the name of the illustrator.

All I know about Pam’s mum is, she likes birds, like Snow White.

If you have not been following this series, I should tell you that the legs above Pam’s mummy belong to Barbra Streisand.

I can only find this page from the book (see below), although the rest is probably somewhere in the house. It will be found by the HouseElves when I’m dead, no doubt.

You can see the whole piece here, or follow my progress on Instagram.

14. Patchwork Of Mothers – Mary Beale

Mary Beale, mother of Charles and Bartholomew, is the fourteenth ‘sitter’ on my Patchwork Of Mothers.

Born in 1633, she was Britain’s first female professional painter, and savvy business woman, earning more money than her civil servant husband.

Pretty flipping amazing.

The painting is a self-portrait, and shows her two sons (see below).

The square was cut from Face To Face, Autumn/Winter 2016, National Portrait Gallery.

You can see the whole piece here, or follow my progress on Instagram.

13. Patchwork Of Mothers – Pregnant Woman

Sadly, the woman I chose for square thirteen is unnamed, but she is pregnant, so that makes her a mother.

She was concocted by William Hogarth in 1750, carries a basket of copies of ‘God Save The King’, and is looking longingly at a grenadier on the Tottenham Court Road.

The March Of The Guards To Finchley, of which she is a detail, can be viewed at the Foundling Museum.

The square was taken from the leaflet, below.

You can see the whole piece here, or follow my progress on Instagram.