Mostly Uninvited 744

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Alice Eve. Photograph by James Peltekian.

The picture was taken from Evening Standard Magazine (29.5.15), found on a train.

Scroll down to see the whole thing so far.

If You Are New Here: This project started (January 2015) with me sewing junk-mail faces onto a big woollen blanket. It has since expanded to include images from magazines and leaflets, I find in bins and on public transport. ‘Uninvited’ was the working title, until I changed it to ‘Mostly Uninvited’. Unless I tell you otherwise, take it that the portrait was part of some junk mail, pushed through my letterbox. I will always credit photographers, illustrators, designers and the faces, whenever possible. All of my work is numbered, this is 632. If you search this number in ‘Categories’, you can find out about the other faces.

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5. Percy Drake Brookshaw, 1963 Birthday Postcards

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Kingsway English, Junior Series Book 1 by J.C. Gagg, with drawings by Drake Brookshaw. Published by Evans Brothers Limited, London 1953. This edition published in 1963.

Numbers: 329 – 338

Right, this is the last of them. I’m stopping at five for now. I have also made ones, threes and fours in previous posts.

All of the numbers have been sewn onto pages from the above book which is fifty years old and I ranted on about here.

337 is made from the back cover.

The numbers are made from Del’s purple shirt, which I also used in the Picasso piece. They have been mounted onto yellow card, which I rescued from the bin at work.

If you feel so inclined, you can buy one here. If you wait until 14th and 15th November, 2015, you will get 30% discount. Use the code GOLD50

Have a great weekend,

Alison x

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4. Percy Drake Brookshaw, 1963 Birthday Postcards

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Kingsway English, Junior Series Book 1 by J.C. Gagg, with drawings by Drake Brookshaw. Published by Evans Brothers Limited, London 1953. This edition published in 1963.

Numbers: 321 – 328

Hullo, Children (see 328)!

If you haven’t been following this project, you can find out more about this fifty years old book here. And if you want to see the cards for one and three, click on the links.

Meanwhile, back to the ‘fours’. I’m still using the coloured card, I found in the bin at work, as a mount for the fabric numbers.

The green gingham was given to me by a friend some years ago, before I had my own children. It used to be her daughter’s school uniform. I made her some birthday bunting with it.

The black and white spot is the torn lining of a bag. In fact, from the very bag I took to Lewisham Hospital when I had my son thirteen years ago. Incidentally, Del , whose shirts are featured on earlier numbers, drove us to said hospital with said bag.

Drake Brookshaw comes up trumps again with some beautiful drawings. 324 is my favourite, with the king and the poor man. Mam and Jane are making cakes on 326, with Dad and John nowhere to be seen. And I often wondered why our dog, Jess, used to turn around about fifty thousand times before she finally lay down for the night, and now I know (327).

If you are interested, you can find them in my shop. On 14th and 15th November, 2015, there will be 30% discount. Use the code GOLD50

Alison x

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4. Napkin Diary For October 2014

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Monday, 13th October

There was a four hour strike today by thousands of NHS workers, including nurses, midwives and ambulance staff.

They would like a 1% pay rise. The government says this will cost too much.

Urgent and emergency care was unaffected, and there have been reports that staff left the picket lines to attend to patients.

The little ambulance was taken from a child’s (Julia Lena Morell) colouring book that I bought from a charity shop in Barcelona. I will be posting more about this shop at a later date. It is on my ‘To Do’ list.

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1. Napkin Diary For October 2014

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Tuesday, 14th October

I have been making notes all month, but it wasn’t until Richard Flanagan gave me a kick up the backside that I actually started sewing.

Whilst watching television, late on Tuesday night,  I heard the announcement that Flanagan had won the Man Booker Prize for his novel, ‘The Narrow Road To The Deep North’. I have not read the book. I will read it in about eight months, when it starts hitting the charity shops by the shelf-load.

It took twelve years and five versions to complete.

The book is set during The Second World War. It was inspired by his father, Archie Flanagan, who spent three and a half years in a Japanese prisoner of war camp. Fourteen thousand people died in the camp.

335, is the POW number given to Archie Flanagan. He died shortly after the book was completed.

On Wednesday morning Richard was interviewed on ‘Breakfast’. He talked about his father telling him how it felt to be starving, in your brain and your belly. He told him what  a rotting ulcer smelled like. “The truth exists in those small, but very real, details,” he said.  He told of how he had gone and met one of the guards, whilst researching his book.  A man the prisoners called The Lizard.

I decided that I really liked Richard. He said his grandparents had been illiterate. He said the prize money would allow him to continue writing. I am glad.

Have a good weekend,

Alison x

PS. Click on ‘Napkin’ in the cloud if you would like to see the other months.

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7. Barcelona Patchwork

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Today, I feel honoured to be featured on the lovely Gabriela’s blog, Barcelonogy.

I’m now onto section seven (of nine) of my Barcelona patchwork.

To recap, I am making an art piece by sewing together bits of discarded stuff I came across in Barcelona.

You can find out about the other sections by searching 610 in my archives.

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Madeline In London

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I am making a determined attempt to get some of the ‘old stock’ from under my bed, and into the sale section of my shop. These are cards I made years ago, onto which my former contact details have been written.

‘Madeline in London’ by Ludwig Bemelmans. First published in 1962, but this edition was published by Hippo in 1989.

I have no recollection of acquiring the book, but I’m sure it will have been beyond repair.

I adore Bemelmans, he was something of a maverick. If you are not familiar with the Madeline books, boy they are good. At first glance you are taken in by the beautiful illustrations.

And then you meet Madeline:

‘She was not afraid of mice,

She loved winter, snow, and ice,

To the tiger in the zoo

Madeline just said, “Pooh-Pooh” ‘

Did I mention all of the books rhyme? Except ‘Madeline’, who never quite rhymes. The publishers wanted this changed, but Bemelmans wouldn’t budge. See what I mean? What’s not to like?

Once you know feisty Madeline, you are hooked, she takes no messing. A spunky female role model. A free spirit. She attends a boarding school in Paris. Pepito, the Spanish Ambassador’s son lives next door. In this book, Pepito moves to London and the schoolgirls visit him.

Madeline (who by the way, celebrates her 75th birthday this year) is a character who stays with you, like Pooh, Clarice Bean, Pi and Jesse Pinkman. But I don’t know who I love more, Madeline, or Bemelmans himself.

Bemelmans lived life on his own terms. He was born in 1898 in Austria/Hungry and died in New York City in 1962, at the age of 64. He became an American citizen in 1918. He didn’t start writing until he was 46, and had his first book published when he was 50. Again, what is not to like?

There are many Bemelmans quotes, but this is my favourite, “We are writing for children, but not for idiots.”

See you soon,

Alison x

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For some reason I didn't number this one.

For some reason I didn’t number this one.