Pearl Mackie’s Eye

 

This eye belongs to Pearl Mackie, actor. I cut it from Time Out London (April 11-17, 2017. No. 2425), which I found on a train.

The photographer is Andy Parsons, who is a lovely bloke.

You can see the other thirty-one eyes, here, if you like.

 

Ian Richards’ Eye

This eye belongs to Ian Richards, homelessness charity worker. I cut it from Time Out London (December 13-19, 2016), which I found on a train.

The average age of death for a homeless person is forty-seven, thirty years younger than the national average.

The photographer is Andy Parsons, multi-award winning photojournalist.

You can see the other thirty-one eyes, here, if you like.

 

Pelé’s Eye

 

This eye belongs to Pelé, who is a footballer. He can also sing and play the guitar. I cut it (the eye) from Sport Magazine (25 September, 2015. Issue 420), which I found on a train. The photographer is Franck Fife.

You can see the other thirty-one eyes, here, if you like.

 

Alan Sugar’s Eye

This eye belongs to Alan Sugar, who has a ‘meaty index finger’. I cut it (eye, not finger) from The Radio Times (19 December 2015 – 1 January, 2016), there was no photographer credited*.

You can see the other thirty-one eyes, here, if you like.

* I have emailed the Radio Times, and am awaiting response.

 

Prince Harry’s Eye

This eye belongs to Prince Harry. I cut it from The Radio Times (17-30 December, 2016), there was no photographer credited*.

The eye was part of an article promoting PH’s charity.

You can see the other thirty-one eyes, here, if you like.

* Thank you to Kirsten Borst at Sentebale, for letting me know that Chris Jackson took the photograph.

 

Mostly Uninvited 797

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Sara Pascoe by Idil Sukan.

Taken from ‘What’s On In May’ (2015), Southbank Centre, London.

Scroll down to see the whole thing so far. Or follow my progress on Instagram.

If You Are New Here: This project started (January 2015) with me sewing junk-mail faces onto a big woollen blanket. It has since expanded to include images from magazines and leaflets, I find in bins and on public transport. ‘Uninvited’ was the working title, until I changed it to ‘Mostly Uninvited’. Unless I tell you otherwise, take it that the portrait was part of some junk mail, pushed through my letterbox. I will always credit photographers, illustrators, designers and the faces, whenever possible. All of my work is numbered, this is 632. If you search this number in ‘Categories’, you can find out about the other faces.

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Mostly Uninvited 796

alisonsye796

Half of this photograph of a woman’s face is taken through a normal lens, and the other half through a UV lens.

The picture was taken from Evening Standard Magazine (29.5.15), found on a train.

Scroll down to see the whole thing so far. Or follow my progress on Instagram.

If You Are New Here: This project started (January 2015) with me sewing junk-mail faces onto a big woollen blanket. It has since expanded to include images from magazines and leaflets, I find in bins and on public transport. ‘Uninvited’ was the working title, until I changed it to ‘Mostly Uninvited’. Unless I tell you otherwise, take it that the portrait was part of some junk mail, pushed through my letterbox. I will always credit photographers, illustrators, designers and the faces, whenever possible. All of my work is numbered, this is 632. If you search this number in ‘Categories’, you can find out about the other faces.

alisonsye796b

AlisonSye681zzzz