Pearl Mackie’s Eye

 

This eye belongs to Pearl Mackie, actor. I cut it from Time Out London (April 11-17, 2017. No. 2425), which I found on a train.

The photographer is Andy Parsons, who is a lovely bloke.

You can see the other thirty-one eyes, here, if you like.

 

Ian Richards’ Eye

This eye belongs to Ian Richards, homelessness charity worker. I cut it from Time Out London (December 13-19, 2016), which I found on a train.

The average age of death for a homeless person is forty-seven, thirty years younger than the national average.

The photographer is Andy Parsons, multi-award winning photojournalist.

You can see the other thirty-one eyes, here, if you like.

 

Pelé’s Eye

 

This eye belongs to Pelé, who is a footballer. He can also sing and play the guitar. I cut it (the eye) from Sport Magazine (25 September, 2015. Issue 420), which I found on a train. The photographer is Franck Fife.

You can see the other thirty-one eyes, here, if you like.

 

Alan Sugar’s Eye

This eye belongs to Alan Sugar, who has a ‘meaty index finger’. I cut it (eye, not finger) from The Radio Times (19 December 2015 – 1 January, 2016), there was no photographer credited*.

You can see the other thirty-one eyes, here, if you like.

* I have emailed the Radio Times, and am awaiting response.

 

Prince Harry’s Eye

This eye belongs to Prince Harry. I cut it from The Radio Times (17-30 December, 2016), there was no photographer credited*.

The eye was part of an article promoting PH’s charity.

You can see the other thirty-one eyes, here, if you like.

* Thank you to Kirsten Borst at Sentebale, for letting me know that Chris Jackson took the photograph.

 

Some Old Men

822

I have made a few cards from vintage knitting patterns.

You can see the documents below, so you know what they looked like before I cut them up.

The no-longer-available Sylko thread is beautiful, giving the smoothest stitching experience I have ever had. Fact not euphemism.

Printed around 1965, is my guess, since the prices are ‘old money’.

I have paired them up with those Waverly envelopes.

All of my work is individually numbered. The camera guy is 822, the older man is 823, and, the pipe man is 824.

They may be used as Father’s Day cards, or they may not, and will start appearing in my Folksy Shop over the next few days.