Vintage Ladybird ‘3a Things We Like’

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I am making a determined attempt to get some of the ‘old stock’ from under my bed, and into the sale section of my shop. These are cards I made years ago, onto which my former contact details have been written. They are totally unique and come with a sewn upcycled envelope. As usual, these cards are made from a used food packaging and are super eco-friendly, as everything used was rescued from the bin.

3a Things We Like by W. Murray. Illustrated by John Berry. Published by Ladybird in the early Seventies.

John Berry was a Hammersmith lad, born in 1920. He died four years ago.

He won a Royal Academy Scholarship, but the war prevented him from taking it. He was a war artist and a lot of his work is now housed in The Imperial War Museum.

After the war he painted portraits. He provided a service at Harrods (where else?) whereby you could drop off a photograph and he would reproduce it in oil.

He has illustrated many children’s books, not just Ladybird, but it is Peter and Jane which brought him to my attention.

See you soon,

Alison x

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Vintage Ladybird ‘Fun On The Farm’

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I am making a determined attempt to get some of the ‘old stock’ from under my bed, and into the sale section of my shop. These are cards I made years ago, onto which my former contact details have been written. They are totally unique and come with a sewn upcycled envelope. As usual, these cards are made from a used food packaging and are super eco-friendly, as everything used was rescued from the bin.

4b Fun On The Farm by W. Murray. Illustrated by Harry Wingfield. First published by Ladybird in 1965, not sure when this edition was published, but it cost 24p.

Harry Wingfield died on 5th March, 2002 at the age of ninety-one.

He taught me to read. Not in person, but by making the reading of those relentlessly boring Peter and Jane ‘stories’ more bearable. I loved looking at his illustrations. The family in the pictures were far removed from my own family, but I appreciated those watercolours nevertheless.

He was a freelance illustrator for Ladybird Books for three decades, retiring in the 1980s. He portrayed a wholesome world, without divorce and disobedient children. Jane helped Mummy in the kitchen and Peter helped Daddy with the car.  Although, in the 1970s Jane ditched her pretty frock for jeans. We did that sort of thing in the Seventies.

I loved his work then, and I love it now. He also did some abstract stuff, for the Ladybird Junior Science series.

Laters,

Alison x

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Upside-Down Footballers Giveaway

 

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On Saturday it was my husband’s birthday, and I was feverishly working away on the above gift.

Regular readers will know that we recently had a great holiday in Barcelona, and that I make art out of discarded materials. Hence, the gift.

In my rush to finish, I put a picture of New Camp (husband and son went to a match) upside-down. Didn’t Freud say there are no mistakes? He would have had a field day with this one. There are thirty-six squares on this piece, and yet, the only one I disrespect is the one which depicts the beautiful game.

 

The little squares have been hand sewn onto ‘Portrait of Jean Yves, a Man Looking Like Vincent Van Gogh’ by Gauthier Hubert. It was part of the annual Portrait Award at The National Portrait Gallery, London. I saw this poster in a ‘Please Take’ pile at work last week, it was beautifully creased and crumpled. The grey mount is the card that came with the frame.

Last Sunday morning, I was on my way to work when I decided to have a facebook giveaway. A ‘Spot My Mistake’ giveaway. Only a small, but select and very supportive, group of people visit my Facebook Page. I like it this way, I feel like I know everyone personally. Only two people gave the correct answer. Only two people entered. They are both lovely.

The giveaway was totally unplanned, so I didn’t have a prize in mind. I was sorting through a shoe box yesterday, and I found these postcards. Made in 2011 with the usual cereal boxes.  They are made from a 1958 Lion Annual, are numbered 603 – 608, and have arrived safely at the homes of Diane and Roberta.

Enjoy the weekend,

Alison x

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Barcelona Patchwork Postcard

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I started making this postcard, from discarded leaflets and the like, whilst on holiday in Barcelona last month.

The little squares are torn, as I didn’t have any decent scissors, and then sewn onto a page from a museum booklet.

The needle and thread were bought from El Corte Ingles.

Back in London, I machine stitched the collage to a piece of grey card taken from the bin at work. Every time I open a box of brochures, I find the most beautiful piece of A4 card positioned on top, to protect the goods. Depending on who opens the box, the card is either saved for me, or put in the bin.

On the back of the postcard, where the message is written, I have sewn a bit of index card and a piece of Filofax divider. Again taken from the bin, this time in the doctors’ waiting room.

I have tried to give all of the leaflets credit in my diagram above, but in some cases a little bit extra is needed:

C and D. We had two lovely meals in Buenas Migas, during one of them I spilled a whole glass of wine over my daughter’s feet. I have cleaned her sandals lots of times, but they are still sticky. Every time I walked by Buenas Migas, I helped myself to a used tray mat from a recently vacated table.

E. This came from a leaflet from MACBA, I am sorry to say I don’t know the artist. Anyone?

J. An empty sugar wrapper from Granja M. Viader, a wonderful old Barcelona milk bar. It was established 140 years ago. The children had their first, and best, churros here.

 

K. This is the front cover of a MACBA leaflet, I used the pages from the same booklet to mount my patchwork.

L. I’m sorry to say that I don’t know where this picture came from. Hopefully I’ll add this at a later date.

All of my work is individually numbered, this is 601.

It can be found in my shop,

Alison x

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Progress

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1. Can’t tell you how much I am enjoying this map collage. Of course, I am way ahead with the sewing, and way behind with the recording of the sewing. If it’s a choice, between making or recording, I will always make. The only reason I am writing this now, is that I can’t thread my needle. Been trying for twenty minutes. When sewing paper, the tiniest of needles is required. I broke my needle-threader this morning.

2. Finally finished those Father’s Day cards. I have been playing with train tickets and cereal boxes for weeks.

3. I have reached Year Two on my work shirt. Ironically, I am finding it extremely relaxing and not at all tedious. Perhaps, on some level, it is therapy.

Have a great weekend,

Alison x

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Fab Dad

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For three weeks I’ve been messing about with cereal boxes and train tickets. Working my sewing machine to within an inch of its life.

These ten little Father’s Day cards are the end result.

I’m not making any more, as I stopped enjoying it at number nine. Maybe next year, if they sell well.

Each card is super eco-friendly, as usual, and comes with a recycled powder blue envelope.

The train tickets were bought and used by me.

If you are interested, please visit my shop,

Enjoy the rest of the week,

Alison x

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1950’s Vintage Buttons New Baby Card

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Lucky Lady Babywear Buttons. Art 22. 1950s.

Number: 244

I made this card ages ago, but never got around to posting about it or listing it in my shop.

The front is made from original 1950s pink baby buttons, three of which have been used, by whom we’ll never know. I can’t help but wonder which current sixty-something wore those buttons as a baby. I was going to use them for their intended purpose, but when it came to it, I just didn’t have the heart to remove them. They have been positioned together like this for longer than I have been alive.

The actual card bit is made from my husband’s posh Dorset Cereals box. He treats himself sometimes.

The envelope is made from graph paper.

Have a great weekend,

Alison x

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