Pearl Mackie’s Eye

 

This eye belongs to Pearl Mackie, actor. I cut it from Time Out London (April 11-17, 2017. No. 2425), which I found on a train.

The photographer is Andy Parsons, who is a lovely bloke.

You can see the other thirty-one eyes, here, if you like.

 

Ian Richards’ Eye

This eye belongs to Ian Richards, homelessness charity worker. I cut it from Time Out London (December 13-19, 2016), which I found on a train.

The average age of death for a homeless person is forty-seven, thirty years younger than the national average.

The photographer is Andy Parsons, multi-award winning photojournalist.

You can see the other thirty-one eyes, here, if you like.

 

Pelé’s Eye

 

This eye belongs to Pelé, who is a footballer. He can also sing and play the guitar. I cut it (the eye) from Sport Magazine (25 September, 2015. Issue 420), which I found on a train. The photographer is Franck Fife.

You can see the other thirty-one eyes, here, if you like.

 

Alan Sugar’s Eye

This eye belongs to Alan Sugar, who has a ‘meaty index finger’. I cut it (eye, not finger) from The Radio Times (19 December 2015 – 1 January, 2016), there was no photographer credited*.

You can see the other thirty-one eyes, here, if you like.

* I have emailed the Radio Times, and am awaiting response.

 

Prince Harry’s Eye

This eye belongs to Prince Harry. I cut it from The Radio Times (17-30 December, 2016), there was no photographer credited*.

The eye was part of an article promoting PH’s charity.

You can see the other thirty-one eyes, here, if you like.

* Thank you to Kirsten Borst at Sentebale, for letting me know that Chris Jackson took the photograph.

 

2. Patchwork Of Mothers – Marlene Dietrich

Marlene Dietrich (in London, by Cecil Beaton, 1936) is the second square on my Patchwork Of Mothers, and she totally dominates the whole piece.

According to Wikipedia, her first job was playing the violin in the pit orchestra of a Berlin cinema. I hope this is true, such poetry in her ending up on the silver screen.

And talking of poetry, she wrote some.

Amazingly long career, 1910s-1980s. Take that Brucie.

She had one child, Maria. When, in 1948, Maria had her first baby, the pressed dubbed Dietrich, “The World’s most glamorous grandmother”.

Maria, herself, was an actress from a young age. She came out of semi-retirement to perform a cameo role, as Mrs. Rhinelander, in Bill Murray’s Scrooged (2001). I haven’t seen it.

The square was cut from What’s On, March-May 2016, National Portrait Gallery. Condé Nast Publications. I rescued it from a pulping.

You can see the rest of the piece here, or follow my progress on Instagram.