2. Patchwork Of Mothers – Marlene Dietrich

Marlene Dietrich (in London, by Cecil Beaton, 1936) is the second square on my Patchwork Of Mothers, and she totally dominates the whole piece.

According to Wikipedia, her first job was playing the violin in the pit orchestra of a Berlin cinema. I hope this is true, such poetry in her ending up on the silver screen.

And talking of poetry, she wrote some.

Amazingly long career, 1910s-1980s. Take that Brucie.

She had one child, Maria. When, in 1948, Maria had her first baby, the pressed dubbed Dietrich, “The World’s most glamorous grandmother”.

Maria, herself, was an actress from a young age. She came out of semi-retirement to perform a cameo role, as Mrs. Rhinelander, in Bill Murray’s Scrooged (2001). I haven’t seen it.

The square was cut from What’s On, March-May 2016, National Portrait Gallery. Condé Nast Publications. I rescued it from a pulping.

You can see the rest of the piece here, or follow my progress on Instagram.

Patchwork Of Mothers

At last, the mothers are finished and in my shop.

As usual, hand-stitched from things others discard.

I’m about to start the process of recording the origins of each square, both here, and on Instagram.

All of my work is individually numbered, this piece is 814.

The links for each post are below:

Mother 1 : Herodias, maybe.      Mother 2: Marlene Dietrich       Mother 3: Madonna

Mother 4: Olga Picasso        Mother 5: Judy Garland         Mother 6: Esther Williams

Mother 7: Twiggy         Mother 8: Princess Margaret      Mother 9: Sarah Forbes Bonetta

Mother 10: Naomi James      Mother 11: Barbra Streisand     Mother 12: Artemisia Gentileschi

Mother 13: Pregnant Woman        Mother 14: Mary Beale       Mother 15: Pam’s Mummy

Mother 16: Joan Maude

 

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Orsolya Szabo by Kathryn Rathke.

The picture was taken from Evening Standard Magazine (29.5.15), found on a train.

Scroll down to see the whole thing so far.

If You Are New Here: This project started (January 2015) with me sewing junk-mail faces onto a big woollen blanket. It has since expanded to include images from magazines and leaflets, I find in bins and on public transport. ‘Uninvited’ was the working title, until I changed it to ‘Mostly Uninvited’. Unless I tell you otherwise, take it that the portrait was part of some junk mail, pushed through my letterbox. I will always credit photographers, illustrators, designers and the faces, whenever possible. All of my work is numbered, this is 632. If you search this number in ‘Categories’, you can find out about the other faces.

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Margate Photographs 1

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This is the first card made from the Margate photographs.

I don’t know the couple pictured, but my mam used to have a dress like that. She made it herself, and I imagine this lady made hers, too.

On the back, the photograph is dated July, 1967. I was a few months old when it was taken. The photograph will be fifty years old this year, as will I.

The card is totally unique and is made with ruthless attention to detail.

I have recorded its making on Instagram.

It is listed in my shop under the heading ‘Valentine’, because society insists we put stuff in categories. However, as the inside is left blank for your own message, it could be used for any occasion you see fit. Golden Wedding would be good, what with the 50 thing.

Find out about the envelope, here.

All of my work is individually numbered. This piece is 814.

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Andre Balazs by James Peltekian.

The picture was taken from Evening Standard Magazine (29.5.15), found on a train.

Scroll down to see the whole thing so far.

If You Are New Here: This project started (January 2015) with me sewing junk-mail faces onto a big woollen blanket. It has since expanded to include images from magazines and leaflets, I find in bins and on public transport. ‘Uninvited’ was the working title, until I changed it to ‘Mostly Uninvited’. Unless I tell you otherwise, take it that the portrait was part of some junk mail, pushed through my letterbox. I will always credit photographers, illustrators, designers and the faces, whenever possible. All of my work is numbered, this is 632. If you search this number in ‘Categories’, you can find out about the other faces.

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Mostly Uninvited 768 and 769

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Georgina Chapman and Keren Craig, by James Peltekian.

The picture was taken from Evening Standard Magazine (29.5.15), found on a train.

Scroll down to see the whole thing so far.

If You Are New Here: This project started (January 2015) with me sewing junk-mail faces onto a big woollen blanket. It has since expanded to include images from magazines and leaflets, I find in bins and on public transport. ‘Uninvited’ was the working title, until I changed it to ‘Mostly Uninvited’. Unless I tell you otherwise, take it that the portrait was part of some junk mail, pushed through my letterbox. I will always credit photographers, illustrators, designers and the faces, whenever possible. All of my work is numbered, this is 632. If you search this number in ‘Categories’, you can find out about the other faces.

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Margate Photographs

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818. Three lovely unnamed ladies.

On July 14th, 2016, I went on a trip to Margate and bought the photographs below (and above).

It was a rare day out with my good friend, Cathy.

So far, I have made a few cards, the posts for which will follow shortly. Post links will be added below, as and when, but you can also follow my progress on Instagram. I will be using these envelopes with the cards, for as long as they last.

You can see the finished cards here: 810, 811, 812, 813, 814, (more to come).

The intention is to list them in my shop soon, but as usual, I am finding it very difficult to take decent ‘product shots’.

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