Pearl Mackie’s Eye

 

This eye belongs to Pearl Mackie, actor. I cut it from Time Out London (April 11-17, 2017. No. 2425), which I found on a train.

The photographer is Andy Parsons, who is a lovely bloke.

You can see the other thirty-one eyes, here, if you like.

 

Ian Richards’ Eye

This eye belongs to Ian Richards, homelessness charity worker. I cut it from Time Out London (December 13-19, 2016), which I found on a train.

The average age of death for a homeless person is forty-seven, thirty years younger than the national average.

The photographer is Andy Parsons, multi-award winning photojournalist.

You can see the other thirty-one eyes, here, if you like.

 

Pelé’s Eye

 

This eye belongs to Pelé, who is a footballer. He can also sing and play the guitar. I cut it (the eye) from Sport Magazine (25 September, 2015. Issue 420), which I found on a train. The photographer is Franck Fife.

You can see the other thirty-one eyes, here, if you like.

 

Alan Sugar’s Eye

This eye belongs to Alan Sugar, who has a ‘meaty index finger’. I cut it (eye, not finger) from The Radio Times (19 December 2015 – 1 January, 2016), there was no photographer credited*.

You can see the other thirty-one eyes, here, if you like.

* I have emailed the Radio Times, and am awaiting response.

 

Prince Harry’s Eye

This eye belongs to Prince Harry. I cut it from The Radio Times (17-30 December, 2016), there was no photographer credited*.

The eye was part of an article promoting PH’s charity.

You can see the other thirty-one eyes, here, if you like.

* Thank you to Kirsten Borst at Sentebale, for letting me know that Chris Jackson took the photograph.

 

Towers 7

Most of the proceeds of this original artwork will go directly to the Khadija Saye Memorial Fund. Khadija tragically lost her life in the Grenfell Tower fire. The fund will help young artists whose background and circumstances might not grant them access to such support.

As the fire was burning, and we all watched helplessly, I spoke to my dad, a pitman. He told me nothing had changed, and that we were still waiting at the pit head for our dead.

It is made using these front pages of the Metro and Evening Standard newspapers, which I found on a train after the Grenfell Tower fire.

The red thread once belonged to my nana, who would not have approved of my knots.

The newspaper is hand-stitched to this paper, and then hand-stitched to this paper.

All of my artwork is individually numbered, this piece is 849.

It is unique and can be found in my new shop.