Margate Photographs

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818. Three lovely unnamed ladies.

On July 14th, 2016, I went on a trip to Margate and bought the photographs below (and above).

It was a rare day out with my good friend, Cathy.

So far, I have made a few cards, the posts for which will follow shortly. Post links will be added below, as and when, but you can also follow my progress on Instagram. I will be using these envelopes with the cards, for as long as they last.

You can see the finished cards here: 810, 811, 812, 813, 814, (more to come).

The intention is to list them in my shop soon, but as usual, I am finding it very difficult to take decent ‘product shots’.

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7. Patchwork Dads – Prince Charles

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Prince Charles is using my stitches as convenient little pockets. Looks like he might enjoy a bit of line dancing. He is the father of William and Harry, or, as my mam calls them, ‘the boys’, as if they live next door.

See Charles below, with his siblings and parents. Prince Philip, who was not in a skirt-wearing kinda mood, is not unlike my beach dad.

This is the seventh square in my patchwork of dads. It is made from discarded books, magazines, postcards and junk mail. It is made from the actual papers, I have not printed or copied anything. There are sixteen squares in total. You can see the whole piece here.

The square is cut from a postcard published by Charles Skilton And Fry Limited, c1972.

All of my work is individually numbered, this piece is 798. It can be found in my shop.

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Five Eco-Friendly Tower Block Postcards

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Five eco-friendly tower block postcards can now be found in the ‘Sale’ section of my Folksy shop, priced at £3.50 each.

Each one is a unique, one-off piece. They are all originals, not prints.

As always, they are sewn from stuff I rescued from the bin; used food packaging, old maps of London, my daughter’s worn-out clothes and postal labels (kindly pushed through my letterbox by my old Postie).

They were made a couple of years ago, at a time of experimentation, and are not nearly so slick as my current work, hence the price. Also, in those days, I did not keep such detailed records of my materials. However, I did not make them to sit under our bed in a shoe-box.

They are blank postcards, and can be used for any occasion which suits you.

They are bigger than regular postcards.

Everything (including sale items) will be reduced by 30% on 14th and 15th November, 2015.

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An unnamed model wearing a Dior dress. Photographer not credited. Taken from a booklet which was handed to me whilst queuing to see Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty at the V&A, London.

If You Are New Here: This project involves me sewing faces, from the obscene amount of junk mail that finds its way into my house, onto a big woollen blanket. ‘Uninvited’ was the working title, until I changed it to ‘Mostly Uninvited’. Unless I tell you otherwise, take it that the junk mail was pushed through my letterbox. Or else it was inside of a newspaper. I will always credit photographers, designers and the faces, whenever possible. All of my work is numbered, this is 632. If you search this number in ‘Categories’, you can find out about the other faces.

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Madeline In London

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I am making a determined attempt to get some of the ‘old stock’ from under my bed, and into the sale section of my shop. These are cards I made years ago, onto which my former contact details have been written.

‘Madeline in London’ by Ludwig Bemelmans. First published in 1962, but this edition was published by Hippo in 1989.

I have no recollection of acquiring the book, but I’m sure it will have been beyond repair.

I adore Bemelmans, he was something of a maverick. If you are not familiar with the Madeline books, boy they are good. At first glance you are taken in by the beautiful illustrations.

And then you meet Madeline:

‘She was not afraid of mice,

She loved winter, snow, and ice,

To the tiger in the zoo

Madeline just said, “Pooh-Pooh” ‘

Did I mention all of the books rhyme? Except ‘Madeline’, who never quite rhymes. The publishers wanted this changed, but Bemelmans wouldn’t budge. See what I mean? What’s not to like?

Once you know feisty Madeline, you are hooked, she takes no messing. A spunky female role model. A free spirit. She attends a boarding school in Paris. Pepito, the Spanish Ambassador’s son lives next door. In this book, Pepito moves to London and the schoolgirls visit him.

Madeline (who by the way, celebrates her 75th birthday this year) is a character who stays with you, like Pooh, Clarice Bean, Pi and Jesse Pinkman. But I don’t know who I love more, Madeline, or Bemelmans himself.

Bemelmans lived life on his own terms. He was born in 1898 in Austria/Hungry and died in New York City in 1962, at the age of 64. He became an American citizen in 1918. He didn’t start writing until he was 46, and had his first book published when he was 50. Again, what is not to like?

There are many Bemelmans quotes, but this is my favourite, “We are writing for children, but not for idiots.”

See you soon,

Alison x

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Vintage Ladybird ‘3a Things We Like’

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I am making a determined attempt to get some of the ‘old stock’ from under my bed, and into the sale section of my shop. These are cards I made years ago, onto which my former contact details have been written. They are totally unique and come with a sewn upcycled envelope. As usual, these cards are made from a used food packaging and are super eco-friendly, as everything used was rescued from the bin.

3a Things We Like by W. Murray. Illustrated by John Berry. Published by Ladybird in the early Seventies.

John Berry was a Hammersmith lad, born in 1920. He died four years ago.

He won a Royal Academy Scholarship, but the war prevented him from taking it. He was a war artist and a lot of his work is now housed in The Imperial War Museum.

After the war he painted portraits. He provided a service at Harrods (where else?) whereby you could drop off a photograph and he would reproduce it in oil.

He has illustrated many children’s books, not just Ladybird, but it is Peter and Jane which brought him to my attention.

See you soon,

Alison x

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Vintage Ladybird ‘Fun On The Farm’

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I am making a determined attempt to get some of the ‘old stock’ from under my bed, and into the sale section of my shop. These are cards I made years ago, onto which my former contact details have been written. They are totally unique and come with a sewn upcycled envelope. As usual, these cards are made from a used food packaging and are super eco-friendly, as everything used was rescued from the bin.

4b Fun On The Farm by W. Murray. Illustrated by Harry Wingfield. First published by Ladybird in 1965, not sure when this edition was published, but it cost 24p.

Harry Wingfield died on 5th March, 2002 at the age of ninety-one.

He taught me to read. Not in person, but by making the reading of those relentlessly boring Peter and Jane ‘stories’ more bearable. I loved looking at his illustrations. The family in the pictures were far removed from my own family, but I appreciated those watercolours nevertheless.

He was a freelance illustrator for Ladybird Books for three decades, retiring in the 1980s. He portrayed a wholesome world, without divorce and disobedient children. Jane helped Mummy in the kitchen and Peter helped Daddy with the car.  Although, in the 1970s Jane ditched her pretty frock for jeans. We did that sort of thing in the Seventies.

I loved his work then, and I love it now. He also did some abstract stuff, for the Ladybird Junior Science series.

Laters,

Alison x

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