21. London Faces Patchwork – John Keats and Charles Brown

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“Happy field or mossy cavern,                                                                                                             Choicer than the Mermaid Tavern”

This is the twenty-first square of my London Faces Patchwork. It is a patchwork of papers gleaned from the pavements of the city in which I live. There are twenty-five squares making up the whole piece. You can see it here.

John Keats, poet, was born in Moorgate in 1795. The Globe pub now occupies the site of his birth, a few yards from Moorgate Station. He died in 1821.

The Mermaid Tavern, of which Keats talks, was destroyed in The Great Fire of 1666. It is said to have been a haunt of Shakespeare, my 9th square.

To continue with the Fleet Street connection on some of these posts. Keats’ publishers, Taylor and Hessey, were at 93 Fleet Street.

This ink silhouette is by Charles Brown, who was born in 1787 in Lambeth.

The square is cut from a Keats House Events Guide.

The patchwork is in my shop.

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22. London Faces Patchwork – Bus Passengers, 1929

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The ’buses run to Islington,
To Highgate and Soho,
To Hammersmith and Kew therewith
And Camberwell also,
But I can only murmur “ ’Bus”
From Shepherd’s Bush to Bow.     Kipling

This is the twenty-second square of my London Faces Patchwork. It is a patchwork of papers gleaned from the pavements of the city in which I live. There are twenty-five squares making up the whole piece. You can see it here.

This poster was designed before London Transport took over the bus companies. At that time there were still open-topped buses in daily service. Here are some buses in action in 1927.

Ride General And Ride Well, 1929, by James Henry Dowd (1884 – 1956).

The square was taken from ‘The London Bus And Tube Book’ by Nicola Baxter. Design Consultant, Jeremy Rewse-Davies. Editorial Assistant, Sharon Appleton. Photographer uncredited. Published by Hodder and Stoughton, 1994.

Bought by Bromley Libraries in 1994, and sold to me, in a rather knackered state, in 2010.

The patchwork is in my shop.

 

 

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20. London Faces Patchwork – Phil Veacock

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“We made records and got into The Charts. We were on the telly and everything but finally we imploded in a puff of musical and personal acrimony. It was 1989”.

This is the twentieth square of my London Faces Patchwork. It is a patchwork of papers gleaned from the pavements of the city in which I live. There are twenty-five squares making up the whole piece. You can see it here.

Phil Veacock of the Deptford Rivieras, he can play the recorder with his nose, and other instruments properly.

The square was cut from a postcard I picked up from the pavement. The postcard was advertising Jazz nights in the Crypt, November 2015. The photographer is uncredited, but thanks to Phil I now know him to be Chris Tostevin-Hall.

The patchwork is in my shop.

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Mostly Uninvited 686

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Joe Strummer by Joe Dilworth. ‘Heroes’ April/May, 2015, Vortigern Gallery. My friend Cathy and I stumbled upon this lovely little gallery on a trip to Margate.

If You Are New Here: This project involves me sewing faces, from the obscene amount of junk mail that finds its way into my house, onto a big woollen blanket. ‘Uninvited’ was the working title, until I changed it to ‘Mostly Uninvited’. Unless I tell you otherwise, take it that the junk mail was pushed through my letterbox. Or else it was inside of a newspaper. I will always credit photographers, designers and the faces, whenever possible. All of my work is numbered, this is 632. If you search this number in ‘Categories’, you can find out about the other faces.

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Mostly Uninvited 685

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Head Of A Fallen Giant by Grayson Perry, 2008. Taken from a leaflet for ‘Provincial Punk’ at the Turner Contemporary. Picked up in the gallery, on a trip to Margate with my friend Cathy (Spring 2015).

If You Are New Here: This project involves me sewing faces, from the obscene amount of junk mail that finds its way into my house, onto a big woollen blanket. ‘Uninvited’ was the working title, until I changed it to ‘Mostly Uninvited’. Unless I tell you otherwise, take it that the junk mail was pushed through my letterbox. Or else it was inside of a newspaper. I will always credit photographers, designers and the faces, whenever possible. All of my work is numbered, this is 632. If you search this number in ‘Categories’, you can find out about the other faces.

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19. London Faces Patchwork – Underground Shelterers

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“One day we heard that a bomb had destroyed the home of a classmate, Derek Barnes. His mother, father and baby sister were killed. Our class clubbed together to buy him a Meccano set. To this day I can see him standing forlornly as he received his gift and said goodbye to us, presumably to start a new life with relatives”. John Gent, a retired London Transport worker, talking in 2010.

This is the nineteenth square of my London Faces Patchwork. It is a patchwork of papers gleaned from the pavements of the city in which I live. There are twenty-five squares making up the whole piece. You can see it here.

During the Blitz, Londoners took shelter into their own hands and went deep underground. The government had forbidden this. During a raid, people would simply buy a ticket and occupy the station. 60,000 people would gather underground. Eventually, the government had to bow to pressure.

This station is Swiss Cottage, London Borough of Camden. It was closed in 1940, so the chances are it was not in use at the time of the photograph. Records show that 41 ‘high explosive bombs’ were dropped in this area.

Sadly, the shelterers are unnamed.

I have only just noticed that the arm in the Turner square looks like it belongs to one of the shelterers. Happy accident.

The picture was taken from ‘The London Bus And Tube Book’ by Nicola Baxter. Design Consultant, Jeremy Rewse-Davies. Editorial Assistant, Sharon Appleton. Photographer uncredited. Published by Hodder and Stoughton, 1994.

Bought by Bromley Libraries in 1994, and sold to me, in a rather knackered state, in 2010.

The patchwork is in my shop.

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18. London Faces Patchwork – Turner

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“Indistinctness is my forte”.

This is the eighteenth square of my London Faces Patchwork. It is a patchwork of papers gleaned from the pavements of the city in which I live. There are twenty-five squares making up the whole piece. You can see it here.

Joseph Mallord William Turner, artist and barber’s son.

Born in Covent Garden in 1775, died at 119 Cheyne Walk, Chelsea, in 1851.

My 11th square, Mick Jagger, lived on the same street (No. 48), with Marianne Faithful. Katherine Hilbery, created by Virginia Woolf (my 15th square) in her second novel, also lived on Cheyne Walk.

The square is cut from a booklet given to me when I visited Tate Britain to see Late Turner: Painting Set Free, September 2014/January 2015. Turner On Varnishing Day, 1846 by William Parrott. Museums Sheffield.

The patchwork is in my shop.

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